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Blue Bandana wins Good Food Awards!

Posted on January 17, 2014 11:01 AM by Amy Lipsitz

Blue Bandana Chocolate Maker won two Good Food Awards for 70% Madagascar and 70% Madagascar Wild Pepper chocolate bars at last night's ceremony! The two bars were chosen by a panel of the country’s foremost chocolate experts for their exceptional taste and for supporting sustainable agriculture and social good.

The Good Food Awards recognize truly good food: tasty, authentic and responsibly produced. The seal assures consumers they have found something exceptionally delicious that also supports sustainability and social good. Selected by a panel of leading experts in the chocolate industry, award recipients are recognized for pushing their industries towards craftsmanship and sustainability while enhancing our agricultural landscape and building strong communities.

“Over the past four years, I have completely immersed myself in all things cocoa, from understanding origin, developing relationships with cocoa farmer, to producing the final product,” says Eric Lampman, chocolate maker.  “It is an honor to be recognized alongside some of the best chocolate makers in the country who are dedicated to making great chocolate and connecting with local producers.” 

Follow Eric's journey on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram and visit the South End Kitchen for through-the window views of bean to bar production.


Blue Bandana in the News

Posted on October 25, 2012 8:28 AM by Caitlin

This past weekend, at our Pine Street Store, we hosted Choctoberfest. Blue Bandana, a fresh approach to making chocolate at LCC, made a splash giving off tastings of our delicious bars, and it was such a hit that the media even came to play. Here's what WCAX had to say about our event:


Missed it? Don't worry, we host plenty of events! Check out our Events Page on Facebook for more info.


Blue Bandana Chocolate

What do wine and chocolate have in common? Aside from the fact that they can pair very well together, quite a lot!

Last Thursday evening, the Echo Center hosted a wine tasting event, featuring wines from several terroirs in France and Italy. The wines were delicious, but what made the event extra interesting was the table of our Blue Bandana Chocolate that also made an appearance. With both high-quality wine and high-quality chocolate present, it wasn't a hard step to start to draw comparisons between the two, in terms of both tasting and origin.

Let’s take the concept of a terroir: A terroir, as Jason Zuliani from Dedalus Wine explained, is a sense of location and place for the grapes. As Jason put it, "this wine exists to communicate place." All aspects of that place can influence the wine, from the soil to the climate to the age of the grape vines. Here are two quick examples from the event:

The age of the vines played an important part in the flavors that came out. Older vines produce fewer grapes, and those they produce tend to be more concentrated, so that the older the vine, the more it can contribute to something in the flavor. For instance, there were two 2010 Riofavara "Nero D’Avola" Sicilian wines at the event: the "Spaccaforno" and the "Sciavè." Both are produced in the same year, but the Sciavè used older vines (43 years instead of 30). The difference in taste was clear! The older vines had a more rounded flavor with bolder tones.

The location and soil of the vines changes the flavor of the grapes created. For example, with the Chablis we tasted, there were two types: Chablis and Petit Chablis, both made from Chardonnay grapes and grown in the same town. But the Petit Chablis, had slightly less limestone in its soil, whereas the Chablis had more. As a result, the Petit Chablis was a bit more crisp and fresh, and the Chablis more rounded.

Now, let’s take these two examples over to chocolate:

Blue Bandana at Echo

The plants themselves: Cocoa trees have a lot in common with grape vines. For one thing, both have to reach maturity before they begin to produce. In the case of grape vines, this can be 3-5 years. For cocoa trees, it’s 5-6. In both plants, a lot of thought goes into the specific type of plant being used. In the cocoa world more and more farmers and producers are getting the skills they need to graft "super producer" trees onto trees that produce fewer cocoa pods. The wine industry is slightly ahead here, but it’s the same concept.

Location: Sourcing cocoa beans, and the soil type and area in which the trees are grown, is just as important with chocolate as it is with wine. We produce several varieties of chocolate from specific sources, including our Tanzania, Peru, Sao Thome, and, from Blue Bandana, a Madagascar and a Guatemala. All of these have differentiating tastes, based on the locations where they were produced. For instance, Madagascar is a huge spice producer, so when you take a bite of our chocolate, you can taste the hints of cinnamon and vanilla wrapped in chocolate. Guatemala, on the other hand, grows a lot of bananas, and those flavors translate into the chocolate itself.

So you see, terroir is important to both wine and chocolate!

Finally, what’s better than tasting wine and chocolate? Tasting them together to see how they work! From the various combinations around, we found two that were true winners:

Chocolate Pairing Set

1. The Blue Bandana Madagascar Black Pepper with the Sang Des Cailloux Cuvée Lopy: The peppery taste of the chocolate brought out new and different sweetnesses in the wine, and the chocolate just blossomed with the help of this delicious red from the Southern Rhône.

2. The Blue Bandana Guatemala with the 1997 Chablis: 1997 was a great growing year for the grapes, and age has only intensified the almost honey-like flavors in this wine. Taste it with the Guatemala and you’ll be amazed at how it brings out the fruit tones in what I often consider to be a very flowery chocolate.

And, for those of you who attended the event and want to remember, or for any of you who missed it and want to recreate it on your own, here’s the list of wines we tried. Don’t forget to continue to experiment on pairing them with our chocolate!

Domaine le Sang Des Cailloux
Winemaker: Serge Férigoule
Country: France
Region: Southern Rhone/Vacqueryas
2010 Sang des Cailloux Vacqueyras
2010 Sang des Cailloux Vacqueyras "Cuvée Lopy"
2010 Sang des Cailloux Vacqueyras Blanc

Riofavara
Winemaker: Massimo Padova
Country: Italy
Region: Sicily/Eloro
2010 Riofavara Eloro Nero d’Avola "Spaccaforno"
2010 Riofavara Eloro Nero d’Avola "Sciavè"

Roland Lavantureux
Winemaker: Roland Lavantureux
Country: France
Region: Burgundy/Chablis
2010 Lavantureux Chablis
2011 Lavantureux Chablis
2010 Lavantureux Petit Chablis
2011 Lavantureux Petit Chablis
2008 Lavantureux Chablis magnum
1997 Lavantureux Chablis magnum


Chocolate Made From Scratch

Posted on October 12, 2012 10:50 AM by Meghan

 

Crankenstein.  Refiner. Winnower.  Sour. Spicy. Earthy.  Fruity. 

What do these things have to do with chocolate?

We are thrilled to present a rare opportunity to see chocolate being made from bean to chocolate bar.  

Blue Bandana Chocolate Maker, a fresh approach to making chocolate at LCC, will have table top equipment (like a crankenstein) to demonstrate how raw cocoa beans are transformed into finished chocolate. 

We talked briefly with Eric Lampman, son of LCC founder Jim Lampman, about how Blue Bandana Chocolate maker came about.

The real adventure began in November 2009, on a trip to visit my first cocoa farm, in the Dominican Republic. After a quarter century of growing up a part of Lake Champlain Chocolates, I finally found myself on the front-end of the cocoa supply chain. I wanted to learn more about chocolate processing, and so I began with a few small pieces of equipment to make test batches of chocolate and refine my technique.

After exploring cocoa beans from six different countries, I settled on three exceptional dark chocolates:  Madagascar 70%, Guatemala 70% and Madagascar Wild Pepper.”


Slow Food Vermont will also be on hand to guide participants through a sensory journey while tasting these three new bars.  Madagascar 70% and Guatemala 70% may sound similar on paper, but your taste buds will tell you differently!

 
Here are the details:  ongoing form 12-4pm at our Factory and Retail Store at 750 Pine Street in Burlington.

Come be one of the first to taste Blue Bandana Chocolate Maker!

 


Celebrating 20 years in the South End

Posted on September 6, 2012 9:58 AM by Meghan

One of our favorite events of the year is this weekend- The South End Art Hop!  It’s hard to believe they are celebrating their 20th year!   The south end of Burlington is a special place for LCC—it’s where Jim Lampman started the company and where we still are today (just in a slightly bigger building).

lake champlain chocolates building

art hop posterLikewise the art hop has grown from a grassroots movement to show some experimental art to a full-blown, amazing celebration of over 400+ artists at nearly 100 locations.   And like every year, we will be displaying some chocolate masterpieces created by resident sculptress Emily McCracken.  She usually likes to keep her creations under wraps until the big reveal tomorrow night, but the poster below should give you a hint

blue bandanaWe are also highlighting another type of craft for this year’s art hop—the art of making chocolate from bean to bar.  It is a sub-brand evolving at Lake Champlain Chocolates that sources, roast, winnow (separates shell from nib), grind, conche, and refine cacao beans into chocolate from scratch.
Blue Bandana Chocolate Maker will be making its debut with three amazing new chocolates:  70% Madagascar, 70% Guatemala and Madagascar Wild Pepper.  Get in here and be one of the first to taste this first batch of exceptional chocolates.

And last but not least, if you’re doing the kids art hop, don’t forget to hop into LCC, complete your passport and collect your prize!

We have a feeling this is going to be a hop you don’t want to miss!


A New Chocolate Maker is in town.

Posted on August 21, 2012 10:45 AM by Meghan

We have some exciting news to share at Summervale this week!

Blue Bandana Chocolate Maker is coming to life based on the principles of quality, transparency, taste of place, and the craft of making chocolate.  It is a sub-brand evolving at Lake Champlain Chocolates that lets Eric Lampman source, roast, winnow (separates shell from nib), grind, conche, and refine cacao beans into chocolate from scratch.

We’ll have two brand new bean to bar chocolates to taste: Guatemala 70% and Madagascar 70%. These may look similar on paper, but your taste buds will reveal the complexity and nuance of these distinctive origins! Plus, our table top chocolate making machines will be in action! Come discover terroir of chocolate and take part in the emerging craft chocolate revolution.

To learn more about the store of Blue Bandana check out this recent article.